Remixed Movie Trailers

26 May 2008 at 11:11 pm 2 comments

| Peter Klein |

As I noted in my review of Yochai Benkler’s The Wealth of Networks, I think that Web 2.0 enthusiasts tend to overstate the novelty of “user-generated content.” It’s true that the costs of creating and disseminating movies, music, and even the written word have, in many settings, fallen dramatically (look at blogging, for goodness’ sake). On the other hand, as Paul Cantor, Tyler Cowen, and others have pointed out, commercial culture has always been, in an important sense, consumer culture. Benkler tends to portray twentieth-century consumers as passive recipients of culture, easily manipulated by Hollywood and Madison Avenue. Yet individuals have always played an active role in shaping the plays, books, songs, and shows made available to them, in their decisions to buy or not to buy, to patronize or not to patronize, to support or reject particular artistic producers and particular products.

Having said this, I do enjoy clever bits of user-generated content. For instance, check out this trailer for Sleepless in Seattle — number 5 on this list of The 20 Worst Chick Flicks of All Time — remixed as a horror movie. It reminds me of the brilliant Brokeback to the Future trailer from a couple of years back.

Of course, the greatest of all such parody shorts is Kevin Rubio’s Troops, now more than a decade old. And don’t miss George Lucas in Love.

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2 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Rich Makadok  |  1 June 2008 at 1:49 am

    Peter, my very favorite re-cut movie trailer is the following version of “Office Space” as a thriller:

    http://video.aol.com/video-detail/office-space-trailer-recut/741755449

    Cheers,

    Rich

  • 2. Rich Makadok  |  1 June 2008 at 2:06 am

    And don’t forget the classic “Vader Sessions” which exploits the fact that Darth Vader’s mask obscures his lips, so one can substitute any dialogue from any of James Earl Jones’s films…


    or

    http://www.akjak.com/vader-sessions/

    It doesn’t qualify as a trailer, but it’s hilarious.

    Cheers,
    Rich

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Nicolai J. Foss and Peter G. Klein, Organizing Entrepreneurial Judgment: A New Approach to the Firm (Cambridge University Press, 2012).
Peter G. Klein and Micheal E. Sykuta, eds., The Elgar Companion to Transaction Cost Economics (Edward Elgar, 2010).
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Richard N. Langlois, The Dynamics of Industrial Capitalism: Schumpeter, Chandler, and the New Economy (Routledge, 2007).
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