Blanchard on Fed Independence

1 April 2013 at 12:05 pm 1 comment

| Peter Klein |

I’ve argued before (1, 2) that the usual arguments for central bank independence aren’t very strong, particularly in the current environment where Bernanke has interpreted the “unusual and exigent circumstances” provision to mean “I will do whatever I want.” (This was a major point in my Congressional testimony about the Fed.) So it was nice to see Olivier Blanchard express similar reservations in an interview published in today’s WSJ (I assume it’s not an April Fool’s Day prank):

One of the major achievements of the last 20 years is that most central banks have become independent of elected governments. Independence was given because the mandate and the tools were very clear. The mandate was primarily inflation, which can be observed over time. The tool was some short-term interest rate that could be used by the central bank to try to achieve the inflation target. In this case, you can give some independence to the institution in charge of this because the objective is perfectly well defined, and everybody can basically observe how well the central bank does..

If you think now of central banks as having a much larger set of responsibilities and a much larger set of tools, then the issue of central bank independence becomes much more difficult. Do you actually want to give the central bank the independence to choose loan-to-value ratios without any supervision from the political process. Isn’t this going to lead to a democratic deficit in a way in which the central bank becomes too powerful? I’m sure there are ways out. Perhaps there could be independence with respect to some dimensions of monetary policy -­ the traditional ones — and some supervision for the rest or some interaction with a political process.

Entry filed under: - Klein -, Bailout / Financial Crisis, Business/Economic History, Institutions, Myths and Realities, Public Policy / Political Economy. Tags: .

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1 Comment Add your own

  • 1. David Hoopes  |  1 April 2013 at 1:04 pm

    Must be The Fed day in WSJ. Other articles discuss problems the current easy money approach might cause. In particular, the current upswing in equities could reverse quickly when money gets tight again. All of this consistent with Peter’s fine talk regarding The Fed. There’s just no reason to suppose some small group of people can “manage” the markets.

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