Shelanski Tapped for Top Regulatory Post

26 April 2013 at 3:40 pm 3 comments

| Peter Klein |

shelanski-howard2My old classmate, fellow Oliver Williamson student, and coauthor Howard Shelanski has been nominated to head the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (the post typically described as Regulation Czar). Howard was in the joint PhD-JD program at Berkeley, went on to clerk for Antonin Scalia, joined the faculty at Berkeley’s School of Law, and served in a number of regulatory posts before moving to Georgetown. He currently heads the FTC’s Bureau of Economics.

Howard’s a super-smart guy, whom I’d describe as an antitrust moderate (unlike me, an anti-antitrust extremist). He’s sympathetic to “post Chicago” antitrust theory and policy, but more of a nuts-and-bolts, case-by-case guy. I’m not a fan Cass Sunstein, current head of the OIRA, and I expect to like Howard’s performance much better. Howard doesn’t share Sunstein’s enthusiasm for behavioral analysis, for example, as seen in an interview last December, where he said this about the role of behavioral economics in antitrust:

I think there is a role, but one needs to be very modest and cautious. There has been a lot written and a lot said about how behavioral economics fundamentally undermines the models on which we do antitrust analysis. And I think most people involved with antitrust enforcement, most people who think about competition issues, would disagree that there is some fundamental new paradigm shift in the works. But behavioral economics does supply insights into how consumers might respond to certain kinds of information, contracting practices, or pricing schemes. This can be very useful to understanding certain kinds of market performance and has led to greater modesty about imputing perfect foresight or rationality to  consumers.

But one needs to understand that that is not the sign of a broader behavioral economics revolution in antitrust.

My general feelings about regulatory czars are well summarized by this passage from Fiddler on the Roof, quoted today by Danny Sokol in the same context:

Young Jewish Man: Rabbi, may I ask you a question?
Rabbi: Certainly, my son.
Young Jewish Man: Is there a proper blessing for the Tsar?
Rabbi: A blessing for the Tsar? Of course! May God bless and keep the Tsar . . . far away from us!

Entry filed under: - Klein -, Law and Economics, People, Public Policy / Political Economy, Theory of the Firm. Tags: .

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3 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Cook, Michael L.  |  26 April 2013 at 4:04 pm

    Thanks for this update on Shelanski, I thoroughly enjoyed the piece you did with him last century. mlc

  • 2. Peter Klein  |  26 April 2013 at 4:06 pm

    It feels like a century ago!

  • 3. Rafe Champion  |  28 April 2013 at 2:49 am

    A millenium ago even:)

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